Thursday, October 18, 2007

Benazir Bhutto Bomb Blast Blame Belongs...

A short while ago Benaznir Bhutto's return to Pakistan, under questionable circumstances - and displays of lack of ethics by both power hungry, trying-to-be-"elected"-President, dictator General Musharaff and power hungry, greedy, corrupt and ineffective, ex-elected-PM-turned-"dictator" Benazir Bhutto - was marred by two bomb blasts that reportedly killed between 40-100 people and injured hundreds more.

The blast has all the apparent signs and hallmarks of being an AlQaeda terrorist attack, especially because of the reported Suicide Bomber element. In addition, this theory is getting some play because some local "divisional vice president" (if Al-Qaeda were organized like a typical US corporation) had already threatened to kill her if she was to return to Pakistan.

There are many others who would be likely suspects. Surely, one could argue, that Nawaz Sharif's supporters would equally want her punished, if not dead, for her jumping into bed with Musharraf shutting him out of the power and money game completely. But, considering that the Sharif element could hardly succeed in getting him back into Pakistan.

However, the one possible place the Benazir Bhutto Bomb Blast Blame Begs to be placed is at the doors of Musharaff directly, or that of his out of control secret military apparatus. Here's how that thinking could go. Musharaff gets Benazir to return under the guise of power-sharing, she dies in a bomb blast and, lo-and-behold, Musharaff has no choice but to declare emergency to "save Pakistan" from chaos. Not a bad plan, if that is what was intended.

There is surely more than meets the eye in this case. What do you think?

Imran

Update: On Oct 25 even Benazir Bhutto is reported to be saying what I am saying.
See http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/10/25/pakistan.bhutto/index.html

4 comments:

zulfi-the-kulfi-wala said...

I quite agree with your assessment of the bomb blast aimed at Bhuto in Karachi. However, I disagree with the insinuation that the blasdt carries all the hallamrks of AlQeda.

Its becomming very convinient for the western powers to issue a threat in the name of Alqaeda to give credence to the War on Terror ploy, in order to further their game of invading to usurp Muslim resources and expand their domain and globalization.

However, it can also be a scenario, that Mush said to Bush, " Hey boss! I have been serving you all along and I can deliver better than the promises Bhuto made. So alow me to delete her pinning it on the extremists so you get your justification for the war on terror and I get to retain the Power to keep in your service".

Despite all the security planned, strongly sanctioned and funded by telaviv, washington and london for the US agent Bhuto, the blast points to the Rogue military intelligence in comand of Musharaf.

Frances Billano said...

Poor Pakistan, caught in between greedy powers within and without. If only she'd be left alone by both the U.S. and Muslim extremists.

Can Pakistan truly keep peace within itself, with democracy? With a worldwide supply of suicide-bombers-for-hire (by anyone!), ready to confuse and rattle the masses into submission? You'll be sorely tempted to think a "benevolent" dictatorship would be the answer to Pakistan's woes. (You can sweep out trash faster in a dictatorship.)

And don't even dare ask if which leader can manage to get 100% unified support from Pakistanis in the end. Bhutto? Excuse me, but CAN she get 100% unified support from her own Pakistani countryMEN, in a post-9-11 world? If it isn't accusations of corruption or of being a "U.S. agent", it's the plain fact that she's a woman that will always make her anywhere from a "risky" to downright "controversial" choice with many of her narrow-minded Muslim brethren.

MB said...

I am not sure if this was Al-Qaeda as there is no neutral way to prove that this was a suicide BOMB. It may well be that ISI planted it and obviously its ISI and intelligence again who tell the media what type of blast it was.

I see ISI and ARMY behind it. It may well be that AL-QAEDA has done it with full support from ISI. Those who dont know history, AL-QAEDA was ISI's own kid it created with a more familiar name TALIBAN in 90s to take over Afghanistan.

Pakistan is paying the price for its illegal child.

zubair said...

There are a number of issues which are brought into relief by the bombing of Benazir's motorcade and what it indicates about the future of Pakistan's politics.
One only has to rememeber the fact that from the very outset of its existence Pakistan has been beset by a contradictory existence. It was founded as a nation on the basis of a supposed yearning of the muslims of the subcontinent for a separate homeland but then in his independence speech Jinnah famously asserted that religion is no business of the state, go to your temples, churches etc. The trauma of East Pakistan has been a lasting influence on the political psyche of West Pakistanis and the fact that its been under military rule I believe is an indication that on some level the interest groups vying for power are bereft of that basic sense of civic virtue which India seems to have preserved to a higher degree, partly because of its secular constitution. And now there's the resurgence of a millenarian brand of Islam imbued with a tragic sense of demoralisation caused by the decline of Islamic countries' stature, largely due to Imperialism but also a sense of personal failure. On top of that we now have the influence of extremism infiltrating the country from Afghanistan.
I believe that Pakistan's only hope is to patch up the problem with India and to enter into a federal power sharing system in the region with other nation states which over the years will expand and consolidate. This would create the conditions for amore stable Pakistan as well as allowing a greater bargaining power vis a vis other such political sytems such as the EU and the US.
Basically Pakistan must politically gravitate away from the its up till now inclination to the middle east and to rediscover its Indian identity and to see that this is perfectly compatable with Islam and that infact the most creative philosophical and cultural contributions to Islam have come from that articulation of Islam with Hindu and buddhist philosophy, The problem with Islam today is its obsession with pure origins and some kind of return to a mythical purity of the Ummah.
The alternative seems to carry on the way its going with the concomitant political instability.